February 11, 2009

It's Ivory Soap time, folks (NSFW due to language)

Oy. This one's bad, folks.

You know how you're supposed to mind your P's and Q's on YouTube?

Somehow, sometime, Eric Cantor, a Republican member of the House of Representatives, managed to "lose it" in what has become nothing less than a personal war against the civil service union known as AFSCME (the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees — and I hasten to add, one of the most reputable labor unions anywhere in the United States) and the advocacy group known as Americans United for Change.

Backstory time: Representative Cantor, who is from Virginia, was apparently egging his fellow Republicans to stall and counterattack the recent stimulus proposals from his Democratic counterparts. AFSCME and Americans United for Change caught wind of it and launched an advertisement campaign calling out Mr. Cantor for his tactics.

Other obstructionists would ask for air time on National Public Radio or PBS — or, if they choose, play "the voice of reason" on any of the multitude of right–wing talk radio networks operating in the States. They might also ask for a brief interview on the BBC World Service if they wanted to.

Not Eric Cantor. No. He chose to trash talk about (against) AFSCME. Using stereotypes and explicit adult words. And re–dubbing an old AFSCME commercial:



Brad Woodhouse, president of Americans United for Change, didn't take long to respond. And he kept his cool:

Does Eric Cantor believe that peddling profanity–laced filth around the Internet is consistent with the values of the people of Virginia or the country? This is childish, inappropriate and disgusting behavior from someone who is supposed to be a leader in Congress and a role model to others. Eric Cantor's response to one of the most serious crises facing America in our lifetimes is to spread this filth, denigrate government employees and treat the current economic crisis like a joke. This video has been floating around on YouTube for years — but Eric Cantor's use of it in this context shows how completely and utterly out of touch he is with the current economic crisis and the lives of his constituents. Eric Cantor should be ashamed and he should apologize.


Don't try to defend this one, Mr. Cantor. You're no Damon Packard.

And you're sure as h–e–double–hockey sticks not from Brooklyn.

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